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Women On The Frontlines Of Campus Carry

In 2016, Texas became America's eighth state to allow for the legal carry of a concealed firearm on campus. While the anti-gunners have claimed the law won't reduce crime and have staged protests in opposition, a new group of voices has emerged to take back the narrative.

Lydia Longoria, Antonia Okafor and Joanna Rodriguez are all members of Students for Concealed Carry, and they sat down with Ginny Simone to explain that this movement has never been about reducing crime—instead, it's about the ability to protect yourself by carrying a gun on campus, just like you do off campus. "I'm not hiding behind my gun," explained Longoria. "I'm empowered by my gun."

In 2016, Texas became America's eighth state to allow for the legal carry of a concealed firearm on campus. While the anti-gunners have claimed the law won't reduce crime and have staged protests in opposition, a new group of voices has emerged to take back the narrative.

Lydia Longoria, Antonia Okafor and Joanna Rodriguez are all members of Students for Concealed Carry, and they sat down with Ginny Simone to explain that this movement has never been about reducing crime—instead, it's about the ability to protect yourself by carrying a gun on campus, just like you do off campus. "I'm not hiding behind my gun," explained Longoria. "I'm empowered by my gun."

"I had a professor who emailed me telling me that they wished they had segregated classrooms for students who had guns. That's how they're trying to ostracize these students."

Antonia OkaforStudents for Concealed Carry

"We're seeing today a lot of indoctrination of young students and young people—without our conservative voice or the right-of-center voice, I think it would get progressively worse."

Joanna RodriguezStudents for Concealed Carry

"How does disarming me—making myself less protected on campus—help you in any way?"

Lydia LongoriaStudents for Concealed Carry

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